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Aircraft steel protection

 
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Steve H



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 96
Location: OK/AK

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:33 pm    Post subject: Aircraft steel protection Reply with quote

I've been cleaning up my SD1 fuselage and it appears that it may have been treated with one of the rust prevention solutions. It is really hard. I know it isn't an epoxy primer. It has been covered with a primer. It comes off with sand blasting but is really slow.

Now for the dangerous part. If you have experience with this process, please sound off! If you have an opinion, please feel free to let me know what it is! Good or bad, for or against, let'er rip!

Where does the FAA stand concerning the use of these products on "certified" fuselages, etc?

This is definitely a free pass for everyone!

Thanks.
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WaltS



Joined: 31 Dec 2007
Posts: 112
Location: North Alabama

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Realy hard....hard to get off even with sandblasting.... Sounds like powder coat. A plastic coating that is applied as a powder then the whole thing is heated to melt the plastic to give an even coat.

My guess..... Rolling Eyes
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planebuilder



Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 46
Location: Midland Ontario Canada

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Walt. I have never seen a hard liquid coating as resistant to sandblast as powder is.
If you had said soft or resilient, and hard to blast off, that’s another story.
Something to consider, does it have to be removed? Is the steel under it corroding or clean. Lots
of powder jobs have been done on poorly prepped metal, then corrosion creeps under the
coating. But if it was prepped well, that shouldn’t happen. It may be that you only need to strip
damaged areas. There are liquid strippers for powdercoat now, you would just need to “clean
up” with the blaster, easier on the thin tubing.
Morgan
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Steve H



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 96
Location: OK/AK

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:45 pm    Post subject: Aircraft steel protection Reply with quote

Thanks for the suggestions on power coating. II have removed power coating from some car parts, and I am sure this is not a power coating. This fuselage has never been completed...tabs, seat, etc still need to be welded up. When the hard stuff is sanded, it results in a "rusty" fine dust. Also, I wouldn't expect a power coating to be painted over with an easily removed primer. Neither MEK or acetone will do anything to it.

Thanks again for the suggestions...keep them coming!
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Starduster History



Joined: 30 Nov 2006
Posts: 735
Location: St. Helens, Oregon

PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 9:17 pm    Post subject: Aircraft fuselage Reply with quote

Steve One other thing, I think it might be is epoxy primer and paint. Some of them are also very hard to get off! Only a really good sandblaster or burning it off with a torch was the way and with the torch, was only in the areas where we needed to do some welding. As for the FAA it is a home built and as such there is no conformity standards that would be required as apposed to a standard category airplane. As always like everyone else it is only my opinion. Dave
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Steve H



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 96
Location: OK/AK

PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 3:06 am    Post subject: Aircraft steel protection Reply with quote

Epoxy primer is a good possibility.

I cleaned up an L-4 fuselage and put an epoxy primer on it...really nice. I had to "spot" clean up a couple of places later, and it cleaned up easier than whatever is on this duster fuselage. However, the epoxy wasn't very old, and I assume it gets harder with age.

Sorry, I should have been more specific in the FAA question. I am asking if the rust prevention/conversion products are allowed on Cubs, Champs, etc.
I'm sure the answer is "not allowed", but haven't ask an IA. This was sort of a bonus question!

Thanks for the info.
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bighuhu



Joined: 31 Dec 2006
Posts: 35

PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:42 am    Post subject: Epoxy primer Reply with quote

In the '70s and 80s Stolp sold an orange epoxy primer that was as tough as nails. I used it and found the quickest way to remove it is with a torch followed by a bead light blasting.
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John Singer



Joined: 03 Dec 2005
Posts: 131
Location: New London, NH

PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As you probably know there is a chemical conversion phosphate corrosion inhibitor.
What hasppens if you take a gas welding torch to it. If it is inorganic,it should fuse just like flux from an arc welder. Anything organic would burn and smell.
If it doesn't burn, it most likely is phosphated just do what welding you have to do. If it all doesn't sand blast off then and there is no corrocion underneath, painty over it.

John Singer (chemist)
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Steve H



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 96
Location: OK/AK

PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2010 5:58 pm    Post subject: Aircraft Steel Protection Reply with quote

Thanks "Bighuhu" and John, and every one else, too, for your comments. I was afraid there were no more ideas coming!

I'll try the torch out tomorrow and let you guys know what happens.

Thanks again.

Steve
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John Singer



Joined: 03 Dec 2005
Posts: 131
Location: New London, NH

PostPosted: Wed Oct 06, 2010 6:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did you try the torch test ? What results ?

Singer
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Steve H



Joined: 21 Aug 2010
Posts: 96
Location: OK/AK

PostPosted: Tue Nov 16, 2010 9:53 pm    Post subject: Aircraft Steel Protection Reply with quote

John, sorry about the delay in this reply. We left for our cabin in interior Alaska right after my last post indicating I would try the torch to clean off the tubing. I never got to try it out.

We've been "stranded" at the cabin for the last 5 1/2 weeks waiting for the Takotna River to freeze so we could drive the snow machine to town (McGrath). So, I just got to check the messages today. We will be back at the Flying H (OK74) mid December and will try the torch thing, and will be starting the wings immediately upon arrival! I'll let you know what happens.

Steve
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